How to make money from A Fair Chance (National Tuberculosis Association, 1954)


How to make money from A Fair Chance (National Tuberculosis Association, 1954)

This film tells the story of a man who has recovered from tuberculosis, and the prejudice and hardship he faces after he comes home. He expects to return to his regular employer, but is told there’s no job for him. Old friends don’t wish to socialize, and his daughter’s acquaintances are reluctant to come to the house. The film makes the point that these attitudes are rooted in a misunderstanding of tuberculosis, its treatment, and a person’s health status after being released from a sanitorium or hospital. Such patients are well, and should be given a fair chance to resume their former lives.

Learn more about this film and search its transcript at NLM Digital Collections: http://resource.nlm.nih.gov/8800007A

Learn more about the National Library of Medicine’s historical audiovisuals program at: https://www.nlm.nih.gov/hmd/collections/films

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How to make money from CPA Movies Tuberculosis,Sanatorium,National Tuberculosis Association

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4 Comments

  • Huh. I didn't even know this was a 'thing' in the US. There sure teach us a lot in school…lol ETA: OMG, I thought they were going to say Ed died at the end when they went on about it taking too long.Thanks again for another interesting video. I have no idea why you don't have more subscribers and comments. These are fascinating.

  • MMcCabe9502 says:

    This was great! Good message. Also, cast full of famous faces. Don Beddoe the employment manager at the furniture company was probably in every movie ever made. Ann Doran was in Rebel Without a Cause. That was DeForest Kelley, Dr. McCoy from Star Trek, at the very end. Wow! Great one. Thanks for posting.

  • Ziggy Blum says:

    I too was astonished to see an uncredited DeForest Kelley at 13:30. A nice bonus for watching an historically interesting film!

  • diecast jam says:

    It's unbelievable that TB was still an issue in 1954 probably a good 10 years after antibiotics were available, I would have thought by then that it would be easily curable.

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